100 Years of Black American History

Photographs that break stereotypes of Black American history is on view thanks to Cornell University
100 Years of Black American History
Man getting his head shaved (early 20th century)

 

Cornell University is hosting 600 seldom-seen photographs from its Loewentheil Collection of African-American Photographs, and they are profound.

Recently digitized, these photos offer a rare look into the daily lives of Black Americans from the era of slavery to the 1960s.

(All images are hosted by Cornell University Library)

 

100 Years of Black American History
Man holding up a baby on a bench, taken at Henry’s Studios (early 20th century)

 

100 Years of Black American History
Nanny with two young boys (late 19th century)

 

 

Cornell’s library curator, Katherine Reagan,  told Hyperallergenic in an interview, “The African American photographs within the larger Loewentheil photography collection are unquestionably important, and we’ve been working on their digitization and description for some time. It’s essential that library and archival collections document as broad a range of American history as possible, so students, scholars, and the public can study and learn from these collections and see their own histories reflected there.”

 

Reagan went on to say, “We elected to present the collection as it arrived, in all of its rich, fascinating, complicated, and — in a few cases  — painful and disturbing elements, rather than suppress or censor specific images. The collection is still in pilot phase. In the future, we expect to add a more expanded introduction that will put the collection in greater context.”

 

 

100 Years of Black American History
African American man standing behind horse-drawn cart of large watermelons, one falling off the side (early 20th century)

 

100 Years of Black American History
Portrait of three players in uniform holding a ball (late 19th century)

 

100 Years of Black American History
Male singing group, lined up with musical notes (early 20th century)

 

Read the full article at: hyperallergic.com