Khadija Saye: The Emerging Artist who was Killed in the Grenfell Tower Fire

The tragedy of the Grenfell Tower in London continues to unravel. The Grenfell Tower was a social housing unit that caught fire in the early hours 14 June. The 600 inhabitants of the 24 floor tower have been in an alternating state of shock and anger as they grasp the depth of their loss. As friends and family of the residents of the tower try to account for their loved ones, devastating news struck. Emerging artist Khadija Saye and her Gambian mother were among the dead. They lived on the 20th floor and were unable to escape the blazing building.

 

 

Khadija Saye: The Emerging Artist who was Killed in the Grenfell Tower Fire

Khadija Saye self-portrait, from the series Dwelling. in this space we breathe © Khadija Saye, courtesy International Curators Forum

 

 

Khadije Saye recently celebrated massive success by being accepted to show her work,  Dwelling: in this space we breathe, in the Diaspora Pavilion at the Venice Biennale.  Dwelling: in this space we breathe explores traditional spiritual practices of Gambia.

Upon discovering the news of her acceptance, Saye tweeted on 10 May, ““It’s been a real journey, but mama, I’m an artist exhibiting in Venice and the blessings are abundant!”

 

 

Khadija Saye: The Emerging Artist who was Killed in the Grenfell Tower Fire
Khadija Saye self-portrait, from the series Dwelling. in this space we breathe © Khadija Saye, courtesy International Curators Forum

 

Khadija Saye: The Emerging Artist who was Killed in the Grenfell Tower Fire
Khadija Saye self-portrait, from the series Dwelling. in this space we breathe © Khadija Saye, courtesy International Curators Forum

 

Khadija Saye: The Emerging Artist who was Killed in the Grenfell Tower Fire
Khadija Saye self-portrait, from the series Dwelling. in this space we breathe © Khadija Saye, courtesy International Curators Forum

 

Her mentors and friends have been making statements to honor Saye’s memory, including the course director of photography at Coventry University and a former lecturer at UCA Farnham, Anthony Luvera. “Her warm and genuine interest and connection to other people’s stories, particularly those who come from marginalised backgrounds or immigrant origins; the astuteness of her questioning; her ability to clearly and creatively express herself; the gentleness of her presence; and, most especially, the brightness of her laughter – Khadija’s life, her talents and the work she left behind, should continue to be celebrated widely,” explains Luvera.

Read the full article at: www.bjp-online.com