Growing up Queer in the American South

Fulford’s photographic gaze is fraught with intimacy and pride.

Peyton Fulford recently was recognized by LensCulture for her delicate series on being LGBTQ+ in the American South, titled Infinite Tenderness.  The photos are beautiful testaments of people who have struggled to firmly stand in their identities in a repressive environment. Fulford’s photographic gaze is fraught with intimacy and pride.

She explains the context of this series, “For the majority of my life, I was unsure where I belonged in the world. I grew up in a religious household in a small Southern town. My mother was raised in the Sanctified Holy Church and my father was raised Southern Baptist. As a result of the strict beliefs I had been taught since birth, I did not feel comfortable coming out as queer until I was 21 years old.”

She continues, “It was difficult to navigate the space I was growing up in because I could not relate to it or understand my place within it. I never felt like my truest, most open self when conforming to the culture and ideologies around me. As I came to terms with my own identity, the photo series ‘Infinite Tenderness’ came to fruition.”

Read the full article at: www.lensculture.com